The Sort of People the Real Upper Crust Sneers At
Bill Quick

(24) Is it considered greedy if a multi-millionaire doesn’t leave tips or spend much money? – Quora

My parents owned/own a decent sized company, so I grew up as a “privileged” young woman in the US, as some would put it. On top of that, both of my parents are heirs to each of their family’s fortunes. Growing up, my parents raised me with a strict set of values that may seem controversial. I will list a few examples here:

My parents owned/own a decent sized company, so I grew up as a “privileged” young woman in the US, as some would put it. On top of that, both of my parents are heirs to each of their family’s fortunes. Growing up, my parents raised me with a strict set of values that may seem controversial. I will list a few examples here:

  • My parents always told me to never leave a tip for waiters/waitresses at restaurants because they are just fishing for tips. On top of that, they sometimes joked/encouraged that it is okay to subtract money from a restaurant bill if you receive bad service/food (though they only did that once or twice, as I recall). I do remember them leaving tips a few times, but those tips were left because the waiters/waitresses were genuine.
  • If you are by chance out dining with someone from a lower class, do not pick up the whole tab; you shouldn’t spend money on the less fortunate. However, if you go out to dinner with only “equal” upperclass friends, you can pick up the whole tab if you beat your friends to it (everyone wants to pay the bill, so there is some competition to be the first person to slip your credit card to the waiter/waitress).
  • If you are shopping in any clothing store and a salesperson suggests you try on a specific thing of their choice, leave because they are trying to trick you into buying something. Additionally, if a clothing salesperson tells you something looks great on you, don’t buy it because they are manipulating you to buy it.
  • They also taught me that people will go out of their way to get more money. For an example, if a car isn’t functioning properly and my dad or his friends can’t fix it, I need to just buy a new car because mechanics will do more damage to a car so they can get more money.
  • They also taught me to look down on anyone below the “middle class”. Even “upper-middle class” people should be approached with some disdain.

There are a lot of other things they taught me for 18 years, but I do not want to bore everyone or take up too much space here. I have gotten in so many fights with people “lesser” than me because of the values my parents raised me with.

I honestly just think my parents were teaching me money conservation and how to be safe in this world, where people will use you for money, or even try to con you out of your money. Lower people seem to think it is merely “greed” and paranoia. A few of my parents’ “equal” friends agree that my parents are a little too paranoid and greedy, but other equal friends think this cautious spending is a smart idea.

I want your opinion: would you consider this all greed, or is it thriftiness? Do you consider it reasonable for “five percenters” to conserve money in such a way? Is it rude to dislike/disrespect people from a lower social class, or is it justifiable since they don’t work as hard and don’t have the right family?

Hilarious.  This person thinks she and her family are “upper class.”

Clue:  They aren’t.

Bill Quick

About Bill Quick

I am a small-l libertarian. My primary concern is to increase individual liberty as much as possible in the face of statist efforts to restrict it from both the right and the left. If I had to sum up my beliefs as concisely as possible, I would say, "Stay out of my wallet and my bedroom," "your liberty stops at my nose," and "don't tread on me." I will believe that things are taking a turn for the better in America when married gays are able to, and do, maintain large arsenals of automatic weapons, and tax collectors are, and do, not.

Comments

The Sort of People the Real Upper Crust Sneers At — 5 Comments

  1. I feel quite confident the term “noblesse oblige” would be incomprehensible to this person.

    I tip more than average, because I make a pretty decent amount of money and I know an extra dollar on the tip means a hell of a lot more to that waitress that just brought my meal than it does to me.

    This young woman doesn’t sound prudent. She sounds like a high-functioning sociopath. Which, according to research, is about 50% heredity, so the parents probably were too.

    The sociopathic marker here is total lack of empathy for those not like her. Such people are not to understood. They are to be disdained and avoided.

    I have known a few such (including, unfortunately, one college girlfriend). I feel some pity for them because they lead such emotionally barren lives, but that pity is tempered by the fact that they themselves don’t understand that. Most of them are pretty happy, or even smug, in their cocoon.

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