Amazon Explains Its Side
Bill Quick

An Important Kindle request

Fast forward to today, and it’s the e-book’s turn to be opposed by the literary establishment. Amazon and Hachette — a big US publisher and part of a $10 billion media conglomerate — are in the middle of a business dispute about e-books. We want lower e-book prices. Hachette does not. Many e-books are being released at $14.99 and even $19.99. That is unjustifiably high for an e-book. With an e-book, there’s no printing, no over-printing, no need to forecast, no returns, no lost sales due to out of stock, no warehousing costs, no transportation costs, and there is no secondary market — e-books cannot be resold as used books. E-books can and should be less expensive.

Amazon just sent this letter to all Kindle Direct Publishing authors. I think it makes excellent points. Of course, I’ve thought that Hachette and the rest of the NYC gatekeeping houses have horribly exploited their authors for years, and continue to do so.

Their fight with Amazon is against what they view as a threat to their right to exploit. Do read the whole thing. It makes a lot of sense.

Posted in Books permalink
Bill Quick

About Bill Quick

I am a small-l libertarian. My primary concern is to increase individual liberty as much as possible in the face of statist efforts to restrict it from both the right and the left. If I had to sum up my beliefs as concisely as possible, I would say, "Stay out of my wallet and my bedroom," "your liberty stops at my nose," and "don't tread on me." I will believe that things are taking a turn for the better in America when married gays are able to, and do, maintain large arsenals of automatic weapons, and tax collectors are, and do, not.

Comments

Amazon Explains Its Side — 2 Comments

  1. Yah, I got that, too. Yes, they make some good points. Just keep in mind that Amazon almost certainly wrote the letter and asked authors to write to Hachette for Amazon’s commercial benefit, not for the nebulous good of us all.

    • I know that Amazon is a commercial organization. However, I accept the argument they make here – that their model is better for authors than the Legacy Publisher model is.

      BTW, I still haven’t received my delivery and publication advance checks from the legacy company, Blackstone, that did the audible version of Lightning Fall. The book was published in audible back in late March, four months ago. Yet they somehow are just too busy to cut the damned check they are contractually obligated to cut.

      I’ll have to start groveling and begging fairly soon, I guess. I forgot how much I absolutely hated that about old line publishers.