Doubling Down – Way, Way Down – On Stoopid…
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Myself, I don’t Twit – or Twerp – or Chirp – or whateverthehell that thing is – so I don’t really know how tricky it is or isn’t, how likely somebunny is to make a really dumb mistake in only – what is it? – 140 characters…

It appears, though, that some “allegedly knowledgeable” folks can manage two dimwit screwups for the price of one:

“Saturday marks 45 years since Lance Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the Moon. Where were you?”

Well – they got the year and one astronaut’s name right, anyway…

(H/T to Weaponsman, the Quiet Professional)

About J.S. Bridges

Ex-schoolteacher, now design engineer (sometimes direct-hire, often contractor/consultant) and CADD instructor. Permanent home in North Carolina. Pro-individual liberty, and strong personal self-defense advocate. Semi-professional gunsmith. Sometime watercolor and glass artist.

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Doubling Down – Way, Way Down – On Stoopid… — 7 Comments

    • There may be something else at work here. People who type a lot develop muscle memories that basically put the physical act of typing on autopilot. I know I’m not paying much attention to what my fingers are doing when I’m typing.

      And sometimes your brain goes on autopilot too, and you’ll think “Neil Armstrong,” but that article you read on Lance Armstrong three weeks back is a newer memory, and presto, that’s what your fingers type.

      I know, I know, sounds like a lame excuse. But I do that sort of crap all the time. And if you think you don’t, write some long form thing of thirty or more pages and then give it, unchecked, to a copy editor. You’ll be amazed at the stuff you did.

      Hell, in LIGHTNING FALL, I went over the ms. half a dozen time, then SteveF went over it, and we still missed a dozen or more bloopers.

      You see this stuff in Twitter more than anywhere else, though, because the whole point of tweets is short, sharp, immediate.

        • Yeah, I do that all the time, too.

          On a previous self-pubbed book I wrote, Inner Circles, I actually turned it into a paper book by printing out the pages in proper format, and then binding the book between covers. I then re-read it and came up with all sorts of typos I didn’t see on the computer screen or on the Word ms pages.

          Sometimes changing the format helps you catch these typos. It’s as if your brain processes the text as new, when you change the format.

          I may do the same thing with AMERICAN CAESAR before publishing it. Inner Circles turned out to be just about error free, as I recall.

          • I may do the same thing [print and then proofread] with AMERICAN CAESAR before publishing it.

            Rather than print it yourself, if that was your plan, check with a Kinko’s or similar. They’ll probably be cheaper than printing at home, especially if you have an inkjet.

            A year or so ago, my wife and I found that it was less than half the price to print a few hundred pages at a shop rather than on our home ink printer. Much faster, too.

      • Hell, in LIGHTNING FALL, I went over the ms. half a dozen time, then SteveF went over it, and we still missed a dozen or more bloopers.

        Yah. My current standard for proofreading others’ work is to read a chapter twice on successive days. I’m experimenting a bit with a third reading a few days later, but it doesn’t seem to help much, probably not enough to be worth the extra effort and definitely not enough to delay getting proofread version back to the author.

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