Students Don’t Need High Points of American History
Bill Quick

Students Shun Constitution And Declaration; Left Is Happy – Investors.com

Higher Education: A university student newspaper has editorialized against a required class teaching America’s founding documents. That should make the left happy. It wants to erase those records from our minds.

A July 8 editorial in the University of South Carolina’s Daily Gamecock is critical of the “state law which requires students to learn about the U.S. founding documents, including the Constitution.”

“Most students don’t need” the class, the Gamecock argues, adding that “it’s almost insulting to require students to pay for a class” they took for free in high school.

I hope this is just some asshole student “journalist” popping off, but this is American higher education, so you never can tell whether the school might not consider it a dandy idea.

Bill Quick

About Bill Quick

I am a small-l libertarian. My primary concern is to increase individual liberty as much as possible in the face of statist efforts to restrict it from both the right and the left. If I had to sum up my beliefs as concisely as possible, I would say, "Stay out of my wallet and my bedroom," "your liberty stops at my nose," and "don't tread on me." I will believe that things are taking a turn for the better in America when married gays are able to, and do, maintain large arsenals of automatic weapons, and tax collectors are, and do, not.

Comments

Students Don’t Need High Points of American History — 3 Comments

  1. It might be educational for the university to clamp way down on the students’ so-called rights. When the kiddies complain, tell them they’re allowed to argue against specific policies, but they need to do so logically. Reference to Constitutional principles will be allowed, as will reference to 18th century philosophy.

    But that might teach the kiddies to think and to argue rationally, so this policy is unlikely to be put into effect.

  2. Along those lines SteveF, let them take a test administered by the U of SC similar to the final exam they would have to take for the required Constitutional course. If they can pass with a reasonable grade then they can waive the class and allow a substitution.

    Let’s see how many actually learned anything in their “free” high school courses. (Do children these days really think their K-12 is free! I guess they pay the teachers and administrators, buy the books, kit out the classrooms etc all out of the money they pick from the money tree in the back of the school. If I were the parent of any child that said that I’d garnish their wages equivalent to the school taxes I paid until they paid their “free” back. Maybe then they’d realize TANSTAAFL and how hard parents actually need to work to cover their K-12 schooling).

  3. “Most students don’t need” the class, the Gamecock argues, adding that “it’s almost insulting to require students to pay for a class” they took for free in high school.

    Seems their editorial board is under the mistaken impression that the public school system capably does its job.