Honi soit qui mal y pense, I guess
nemo paradise

This immigration story has more facets than a gem, and its richness of detail and anecdote entertain even as they bewilder. But I have this idea that keeps floating by, like a movie, of a scene that I shamefully suspect may be playing out in the minds of some folks in the White House and Justice Departments.

Frankly, this fantasy embarrassed me, because I should be a better person. But, I think:

“What if all those folks citing in grave and somber tones the depth of the humanitarian crisis, the plight of the poor children, the obligations we have to those suffering from violence and lawlessness, and the cruelty of deportation — what if they actually go to sleep each night visualizing the looks on the faces of the citizens in small, sleepy, middle-class hamlets when they are suddenly confronted by buses filled with teenage gangsters who speak no English, who have no [legal] skills, who have little or no education, and are now dumped into their communities?”

They must be laughing their asses off. “Nice little town you have here, folks. Meet your new neighbors.”

Naw. That couldn’t be. Could it?

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nemo paradise

About nemo paradise

Nemo has been perversely fascinated by finance since emergence from college as an English major with little or no math. His opinions, analysis and observations are generally subjective, and employ vast amounts of quantitative analysis the same way that an elephant turns savannahs into useful energy, with impressive piles of dung as a by-product. Nemo has been professionally employed in the trading and analysis of and commentary on financial markets since 1972. Nemo makes no short-term predictions, except when seized by caprice. The future is inherently unknowable, but is subject to analysis. Very, very infrequently, this analysis uncovers situations where outcomes are not random over the longer term. And, as you can tell, Nemo is a smug son of a bitch who has learned from his mistakes to guard his projections very, very carefully, but has no hesitation in attacking like a starving wolverine the misconceptions, idiotic assumptions and howling fallacies that financial pundits offer with stunning frequency.

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