A Flutter Goes Through the RINO House
Bill Quick

Immigration Reform — And The Dangers of Right-Wing Populism | The Daily Caller

I’ll spare you my thoughts on last night’s shocking primary surprise, and just focus on one of the potential consequences: The triumph of right-wing populism, and — more specifically — the death of immigration reform. To be honest, I think it was already dead, but if not, this was the final nail in the coffin.

While some elements of conservative populism are commendable (such as concerns about big business colluding with big government) I remain convinced that immigration reform is solid policy, and that there are many reasons why conservatives ought to support more immigrants.

Lewis, given your thoughts on Scamnesty, I’m frankly not interested in your views on anything of interest to actual, you know, conservatives.

Bill Quick

About Bill Quick

I am a small-l libertarian. My primary concern is to increase individual liberty as much as possible in the face of statist efforts to restrict it from both the right and the left. If I had to sum up my beliefs as concisely as possible, I would say, "Stay out of my wallet and my bedroom," "your liberty stops at my nose," and "don't tread on me." I will believe that things are taking a turn for the better in America when married gays are able to, and do, maintain large arsenals of automatic weapons, and tax collectors are, and do, not.

Comments

A Flutter Goes Through the RINO House — 4 Comments

  1. “why conservatives ought to support more immigrants.”

    Lying liars like this really piss me off. Conservatives don’t have a problem with more immigrants. We don’t want a big influx of unskilled workers and/or criminals.

  2. I see immigration as closely connected to economic liberty. The ultimate justification for an open immigration policy is simply that choosing to employ, rent or sell lodging to someone is not rights violating, regardless of where the other person was born.

    That being the case, though, I dismiss pleas for immigration reform that are not coupled with economic liberty reform. Want more immigrants? Show me a ‘comprehensive’ reform proposal that cuts taxes, rolls back government interference in the economy and cuts back the welfare state. Do that and I’m fine with increasing immigration. But if you want to keep raping my economic liberty then you have no basis for asserting immigrant rights — at root, the two are one and the same.