The Shame of the Boomer Lefties On Memorial Day
Bill Quick

Roger L. Simon » Blame Me for Everything on Memorial Day

I did  everything I could not to fight in Vietnam.  To be honest, it wasn’t really in the cards anyway.  I was in grad school, married with a kid on the way. Besides, I was from the upper middle class.  There were always ways out if my number came up, people to call.

Making war wasn’t for the likes of me. I was an intellectual, an artist – a liberal or even a leftist.  I had read Bertrand Russell.

Was I coward?

Yes.  So was I.  And so were most of my fellow leftist anti-warriors.  I learned to admit it to myself, and to live with the shame of it every day for the rest of my life.

As did you.  We are the minority, though.  But at least we do know shame.  They don’t, and that says nothing good about them.  Nothing at all.

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Bill Quick

About Bill Quick

I am a small-l libertarian. My primary concern is to increase individual liberty as much as possible in the face of statist efforts to restrict it from both the right and the left. If I had to sum up my beliefs as concisely as possible, I would say, "Stay out of my wallet and my bedroom," "your liberty stops at my nose," and "don't tread on me." I will believe that things are taking a turn for the better in America when married gays are able to, and do, maintain large arsenals of automatic weapons, and tax collectors are, and do, not.

Comments

The Shame of the Boomer Lefties On Memorial Day — 4 Comments

  1. A few of us stayed out of Vietnam the old-fashioned way.

    Draft number 348. As the fellow said, “Damn. They’ll be taking Senator’s sons before they get to you.”

    Haven’t won a lottery since. But, when it counted, I came up aces.

  2. I too was a coward, albeit an intelligent one. There was NO WAY I was going to be young cannon fodder in that misguided old-man’s-war, illegally foisted on the American public thru outright lies (can anyone say “Gulf of Tonkin Resolution”?), mismanaged thru “strategies” like pacification and metrics like bogus body counts, all to prop up the corrupt remnants of a failed French colony. If drafted, I was ready to go to Canada — failing that I probably would have fragged the first green 2nd luey who gave me a stupid order. It led to a 15 yr. falling out with my father, who, along with his 4 brothers, all served honorably in WWII.

    Those who went had it little better. If they survived, they returned to disrespect and abuse, only to see their sacrifices thrown away by feckless politicians. It was lose-lose for an entire generation.

  3. Same here I numbered out in the 300’s somewhere. At the time I had 2 future brother in laws, Rangers, who had been in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, both telling me whatever happened find some way not to go.