Honest Pay for an Honest Day
SteveF

Fast food workers strike for higher wages

Hundreds of fast food workers walked off their jobs in dozens of U.S. cities on Thursday … as sympathetic protesters in several dozen countries joined in a united call for wages of $15 an hour and the right to form a union.

And it’s likely to be effective. Check this out:

Naquasia LeGrand, 22, of Brooklyn, says this was her sixth strike since 2012.

This time for sure, I guess.

And they’re claiming the moral high ground, too:

For him, the decision was about asking for respect

How can anyone argue with wanting respect from one’s employer?

… in the form of better pay. He says that paying him $8 an hour is like “spitting in my face.”

Never mind…

There’s an easy solution to the money woes of the downtrodden fast food workers: quit your mcjobs and get jobs where you’ll be paid what you’re worth, based on your skills and application to assigned tasks. What’s that? Your $8/hr makes you barely worth employing as it is?

Then I guess there’s only one remaining solution: get Congress to bump the minimum wage to $15/hr or higher, or just get the tyrant to decree it. Then those franchise owners — who are no better than slave owners — can just suck it up… until the fast food parent corporations buy newly-developed machinery which will cut staffing needs down to the manager and one cashier. Profit will increase and the fired workers will no longer have any reason to complain about wages which are so low they’re like spitting in their face. Everyone wins!

Comments

Honest Pay for an Honest Day — 7 Comments

  1. “until the fast food parent corporations buy newly-developed machinery which will cut staffing needs ”

    I just saw something a couple days ago that McDonalds is going to buy several thousand self-service kiosks for European stores. You can be sure they’ll have them in place in the US as soon as they physically can if the minimum wage goes up to $15.

    ” her sixth strike since 2012.”

    Any bets those six strikes weren’t at six different places?

    • … until the fast food parent corporations buy newly-developed machinery which will cut staffing needs down to the manager and one cashier.

      There’s a Whole Foods coffee shop/beer/wine bar, and “restaurant” attached to the local Whole Foods grocery I go to.

      In the restaurant, you walk up to a machine, touch the picture of what you want (there is also text if you happen to be able to read) feed it your money card, and it spits out a receipt with a number on it. You go have a seat at an available table, and when your number is called, you go up to the counter, pick up your food and whatever utensils you want. You go back to your table and eat, and when you’re done, you take your trash to the recycling rack and parcel it out according to the pictures.

      Total employees in the food operation? One. Total in the whole place? Three.

      Progressives love Whole Foods in SF, by the way.

      • Yup, that’s what I’m talking about.

        BTW, you don’t need anything exotic, either. Square, the guys who make that credit card reader, have a new system that a local burger joint is using the last few weeks. It’s an iPad Mini in a rotating stand with a built-in credit card swiper and some kind of ordering software. The cashier punches in your order, turns the machine around, and you swipe your card, get the option to choose 10, 15, 20% or custom/no tip, push a button to draw your signature with your finger, push ‘done’ and a receipt prints if you want one. It’s not a big step from there to eliminate the cashier entirely.

        Couple that with a burger-flipping robot, and, well, that $15/hour demand doesn’t seem so smart, now does it?

        • Couple that with a burger-flipping robot, and, well, that $15/hour demand doesn’t seem so smart, now does it?

          The tech that can keep the robot performing as advertised, and the ingredients topped off, and keep the thing sanitary…they’re going to make more than $15/hr. Especially since only one person will be handling the money-input-device. You’ll need to pay him.

          But he won’t make anything like what a full crew of fast foodies make, cumulative.

  2. “Hey, the new minimum wage is $15/hour~”

    “Nope, it’s still $0/hour. Now get out. You’re standing where your robotic replacement will now be working.”

    ==============================

    I hope that thousands of these conversations take place.

  3. … until the fast food parent corporations buy newly-developed machinery which will cut staffing needs down to the manager and one cashier.

    …which will, incidentally, almost entirely remove the ever-present possibility of the low-wage-resentment-and/or-boredom-driven “loogie in the mayo/salad dressing/burger broiler” phenomenon and similar minor-league atrocities.

    I do not speak from personal observation – however, I am reliably informed that said phenomenon has been known to occur in significant instances throughout the lower ranks of the industry. Robotic sandwich-and-salad assemblers should serve to pretty well obviate such “creative adulterations.”

    In addition, it seems entirely likely that “fast food” will, once again, be “fast”; when properly set up and maintained, automated machinery can out-speed humans at essentially-repetitive tasks, by far, every time. The last time I attempted to avail myself of the services of such a facility, my time expenditure was only marginally less than what would have been required for similar-level food from a “regular-speed” restaurant. Admittedly, it was during the lunchtime “rush hour”, but still…

    Go ahead, dummies – get Big-Daddy Gummint to help you price yourselves out of an already-marginally-low-skill job. In real-world terms, the rest of the citizenry will be better off by far, on balance…