Big Trouble In Little Sedition?
Bill Quick

The Case for a Little Sedition | National Review Online

The theory of modern government is fundamentally Hobbesian in its insistence that where political obedience is demanded, that demand must be satisfied lest we regress into bellum omnium contra omnes. I myself am of the view that there is a great deal of real estate between complete submission and civil war, and that acts such as Mr. Bundy’s are not only bearable in a free republic but positively salubrious. Unhappily, those views are not shared by many in Washington, and, if I were a wagering sort, my money would be on Mr. Bundy ending up dead or in prison, with a slight bias in the odds toward death.

I would further submit that there’s a good bit of real estate between the Hobbesian War of All Against All, a fancy term for pure anarchy, and a civil war.    And more than a few observers might find it difficult to swallow the notion that the American Civil War and the Revolutionary War were identical in nature and intent.  Although some die-hard confederates and libertarians might find the idea congenial.  I am, however, not one of them.

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Bill Quick

About Bill Quick

I am a small-l libertarian. My primary concern is to increase individual liberty as much as possible in the face of statist efforts to restrict it from both the right and the left. If I had to sum up my beliefs as concisely as possible, I would say, "Stay out of my wallet and my bedroom," "your liberty stops at my nose," and "don't tread on me." I will believe that things are taking a turn for the better in America when married gays are able to, and do, maintain large arsenals of automatic weapons, and tax collectors are, and do, not.

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