Credentials Aren’t Education
Bill Quick

Sand in the Gears » Blog Archive » The professor in the home

Every month, money flies from my checking account to the education savings accounts of my children, because I don’t want them to become hobos. This is one way I allay my fear the world will eat them up. It’s a mark of a good parent to worry over where—and whether—his child will go to college, isn’t it?

I need to confess a profoundly un-American heresy: I question what my children will get for the money. I don’t question the value of education (though we make it a panacea for deeper ills of the soul); I doubt the capacity of most educational institutions to impart much beyond what one could obtain with, as the protagonist in Good Will Hunting notes, “a dollar-fifty in late charges at the public library.”

If that.  If parents are brutally honest with themselves, they should know that they are saving to purchase their kid a credential, and the more valued the credential, (Harvard?), the more expensive it will be.

Any actual education that might occur during the process will likely be strictly accidental, more a matter of luck than of planning.  Doesn’t mean that the credential won’t be helpful.  Just be sure you understand what you’re paying for.

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Bill Quick

About Bill Quick

I am a small-l libertarian. My primary concern is to increase individual liberty as much as possible in the face of statist efforts to restrict it from both the right and the left. If I had to sum up my beliefs as concisely as possible, I would say, "Stay out of my wallet and my bedroom," "your liberty stops at my nose," and "don't tread on me." I will believe that things are taking a turn for the better in America when married gays are able to, and do, maintain large arsenals of automatic weapons, and tax collectors are, and do, not.

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